READY TO ROLL

READY TO ROLL

Friday, December 07, 2007

TRUCK COMPANIES

From Collection of Arlington Fire Capt. Randy Higgins








ENGINE 66

Engine 66, staffed by federal firefighters, protected the old Arlington Hall Station of the U.S. Army until base closed in 1990.

The two-piece engine company, which consisted of a wagon and a pumper, covered Box 6672 - and rarely left the post. It was a quiet station. Very quiet.

Today, the site - at Route 50 and George Mason Drive - is occupied by the State Department training center and the National Guard.

This photo of Engine 66's wagon is from the collection of Arlington Fire Capt. Randy Higgins.

The rig - a 1980 Hahn/Firetec 1000/500/30 - was transferred to the Fort Belvoir Fire Department in Fairfax County, according to Higgins.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007

2007 APPARATUS ROSTER


Engine 103 and Rescue 104
(Photo courtesy of
www.acfd3.com)

Station No. 1 - Engine 101, Medic 101, Hazmat 101, Battalion 111
Station No. 2 - Engine 102, Medic 102, EMS 112, Mobile Command
Station No. 3 - Engine 103
Station No. 4 - Rescue 104, Truck 104, Medic 104, Battalion 112, Safety 114
Station No. 5 - Engine 105, Truck 105, Medic 105
Station No. 6 - Engine 106, Truck 106, Medic 106, Ambulance 106, Utility 106, Canteen 106, Light & Air 103
Station No. 7 - Engine 107
Station No. 8 - Engine 108, Medic 108, Air 108
Station No. 9 - Engine 109, Rescue 109, Medic 109, EMS 111
Station No. 10 - Engine 110, Medic 110, TRT 110
Station No. 61 - Rescue Engine 161, Rescue Engine 162
Pentagon Heliport - ARFF
National Airport - Rescue Engine 335, Medic 325, ARFF

Monday, May 07, 2007

BUS FIRE

ADDED FEBRUARY 2008


On June 7, 2007, fire destroyed an Arlington Transit ART bus as it was making a night-time run.

According to an official Arlington County press release:

``The fire broke out at about 7:40 p.m. on an ART bus making the final northbound run on ART Bus Route 75, as the bus entered the intersection of South Carlin Springs Road and 6th Street. All three passengers aboard and the driver evacuated without injury.

``The bus driver told Arlington County Fire Department officials that he saw smoke coming from rear wheels and pulled over in front of 601 Carlin Springs Road. Flames quickly engulfed the bus, and damaged cable and power lines directly overhead. The utilities were shut down to avoid any injuries on scene, causing some temporary cable and power outages.''

COLD WAR CLASSIC

Arlington County operated CD Rescue unit in 1950s
(Photo courtesy of www.civildefensemuseum.com)

Friday, April 27, 2007

IN REMEMBRANCE

Graves of Sept. 11 victims at Arlington National Cemetery

DEADLIEST FIRES IN ARLINGTON COUNTY HISTORY
  • Pentagon - Sept 11, 2001 ... 189 victims

  • Park Warren Apartments - Nov. 15, 1996 ... 4 victims

  • Rooming house, Ballston - Nov. 14, 1986 ... 3 victims

  • House, South Arlington - Dec. 1944 ... 3 victims

Thursday, April 19, 2007

ASSORTED PHOTOS

WRECKAGE OF FOAM 161 - PENTAGON 9/11/01

HOLLINGER BOX COMPANY - 1950s
OLD RADIO ROOM - STATION 4

OLD SQUAD 5

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

RUNS & WORKERS

REFINERY FIRE - 1924: Fire broke out at the Crown Oil and Wax Company in Rosslyn on Aug. 6, 1924 - and threatened nearby petroleum storage tanks. The District of Columbia Fire Department assisted Arlington's volunteer companies. The fire was ignited by ``a short-circuit in wires connecting the pumps,'' according to The Washington Post.

DISPUTE OVER MUTUAL AID - 1924: ``Chief Jack A. Spates of the Cherrydale fire department, answering charges made by J.M. Duncan, assistant chief of the Alexandria department, last night denied any property was in danger as the result of the fire Monday, which destroyed the home of William Sothern in Jefferson district, when he refused Duncan's request for use of the Cherrydale hose.'' - The Washington Post, Nov. 19, 1924

ROSSLYN EXPLOSION - 1945: The Dec. 10, 1945 edition of The Washington Post reported: ``The early-Sunday quiet of Rosslyn, Va., was spectacularly broken yesterday when a 5000-gallon runaway truck-trailer loaded with high test gasoline crashed into a parked milk truck and exploded.''

FIREMEN OVERCOME - 1952: On July 4, 1952, six firefighters were injured at a blaze at the Drug Fair store at 4821 Columbia Pike. Five of the men suffered smoke inhalation, The Washington Post said. About a week earlier, June 26, 1952, dozens of firemen were overcome by smoke and heat at a fire at the Noland Co. warehouse in Rosslyn.

DAMAGE TO STATION NO. 7 - 1954:
``The four-ton pumper housed in the Fairlington firehouse has been moved out after two cracks appeared in the concrete floor,'' according to the Oct. 9, 1954 edition of The Washington Post.